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Douglas Pacaccio, DPM
Thomas Nordquist, DPM

May 2024

Tuesday, 28 May 2024 00:00

Heel Pain

Heel pain can be difficult to deal with, especially if you do not know what the underlying cause is. If you ignore your heel pain, the pain can magnify and potentially develop into a chronic condition. Depending on the location of your heel pain, you have developed a specific condition.  

One condition is plantar fasciitis.  Plantar fasciitis is caused by the inflammation of the plantar fascia, or the band of tissue that connects the heel bone to the base of the toes. The pain from this condition is initially mild but can intensify as more steps are taken when you wake up in the morning. To treat this condition, medication will likely be necessary. Plantar fasciitis is often associated with heel spurs; both require rest and special stretching exercises.

There are various options your podiatrist may suggest for heel pain.  Treatment options for heel pain typically include non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS), which may reduce swelling and pain. Other options are physical therapy, athletic taping, and orthotics. In severe cases of heel pain, surgery may be required.

Preventing heel pain is possible.  If you are looking to prevent heel pain from developing in the future, be sure to wear shoes that fit you properly and do not have worn down heels or soles. Be sure to warm up properly before participating in strenuous activities or sports that place a lot of a stress on the heels. If you are experiencing any form of heel pain, speak with your podiatrist to determine the underlying cause and receive the treatment you need.

Tuesday, 21 May 2024 00:00

Three Grades of Ankle Sprains

An ankle sprain occurs when one or more ankle ligament gets overly stretched. Ligaments are strong bands of tissue that bind and support the bones and other structures that make up the ankle. In more severe ankle sprains, the ligament(s) tear—either partially or completely—and there may be an audible popping noise at the moment of injury.

Ankle sprains are quite common and can occur when the ankle rolls outwardly (eversion) or inwardly (inversion), causing the ligament(s) to stretch beyond normal limits, or even tear. Falls, twists, or blows to the ankle during sports or other activities can cause this injury, as well as wearing improper footwear, running on uneven surfaces, or having weak ankles.

Depending on the injury’s severity, an ankle sprain will be classified as Grade I, Grade II, or Grade III. Grade I sprains involve ligament(s) being overly stretched but not torn, with symptoms of mild pain, swelling, and ankle instability. There may also be some difficulty bearing weight. A Grade II sprain usually involves a partial tear of the ligament which brings more intensity in these symptoms, along with possible bruising. With a Grade III sprain, the ligament is completely torn, the symptoms are severe, and it may not be possible to put weight on the affected foot at all. 

To diagnose and grade an ankle sprain, a podiatrist will perform a physical examination, checking for tenderness and range of motion in the ankle. For more severe sprains, X-rays or other imaging studies may be necessary. 

It is vitally important to have an ankle sprain treated properly as improper healing often leads to future ankle sprains and possibly even chronic ankle stability. Treatment for an ankle sprain will vary, depending on its severity, and may include the RICE method (Rest/Ice/Compression/Elevation), physical therapy, bracing, medications, and possibly even surgery to repair a torn ligament. Rehabilitation is very important for the sprain to heal properly and to restore functionality.

Tuesday, 14 May 2024 00:00

Plantar Fibroma

A plantar fibroma is a knot in the arch of the foot. It can cause pain when repeated pressure is applied by walking barefoot or wearing tight shoes. While plantar fibromas can appear in anyone, men who are middle-aged or older are said to be more susceptible. The main symptom of a plantar fibroma is a firm lump on the arch of the foot. If there is pain, it can be intensified by putting pressure on the nodule. The lump can stay one size or grow larger. You may have one or more fibromas in the feet and there tends to be a high incidence of recurring plantar fibromas.  Generally, a plantar fibroma can be treated without surgery. Treatment might include steroid injections to help shrink the lump, orthotics to help redistribute weight away from the nodule, plantar fascia stretching, or physical therapy to help use anti-inflammatory medication on the lump. If a lump grows larger or more painful, a podiatrist can be consulted to confirm the diagnosis. The doctor will palpate the lump and this may cause pain that can be felt all the way to the toes. An X-ray, MRI, or biopsy might be done if further evaluation is necessary. A lump in the arch of the foot might be something other than a plantar fibroma, such as cysts, nerve or fatty tumors, swollen tendons, or an infection in the foot. It is important to see a podiatrist for proper diagnosis and treatment of plantar fibromas.

Tuesday, 07 May 2024 00:00

Blisters on the Feet

Blisters are a common ailment of people who wear shoes that are either too tight or rub against the feet in an uncomfortable way. Knowing the basics of blisters is important for understanding how they are formed and what treatments should be used for them.

A blister on the foot, or any other part of the body, is a small pocket that is filled with fluid. It usually forms on the upper layer of the skin because these layers are loose enough to allow a blister to form. The most common fluid in a blister is just a clear, watery-like fluid that usually isn’t cause for concern. However, blisters can fill up with blood if they are deep enough and pus if they have become infected with bacteria.

Blisters almost always form on the feet due to shoes rubbing up against the foot, where the friction causes blisters. These can occur after you have walked for a long period of time or when your shoes do not fit you properly. Your feet are also more prone to blisters if they are moist, so keeping them dry and clean is one preventative step you can take.

Preventing infection should be the number one concern when treating blisters, as well as relieving the pain they can cause. Using a bandage to cover up the blister will help it heal and prevent bacteria from entering it. New skin will form under the blister and eventually cause it to pop. You can also take a sterilized pin and try to pop it yourself.

If the blister is filled with pus or blood, seeking treatment from a doctor is ideal. Antibiotics may need to be taken in order to completely eliminate the bacteria inside the blister. See a doctor to have an antibiotic prescribed.

The best way to treat blisters is to prevent them all together. Keeping your feet dry and making sure that your shoes fit properly are just two of the steps you can take to prevent blisters. Shoes that are too tight or shoes that are too loose and allow your feet to slide in them will cause blisters. Applying a bandage to an area where you think a blister is about to form is another way you can prevent them.

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